ReViewing Chess: Alekhine, Exchange, Vol. 2.1 (ReViewing Chess: Openings)

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Manufacturer Description

ReViewing Chess: Exchange, Vol. 2.1 utilizes the cinema method permitting anyone to play hundreds of masterful games. As part of the openings collection, these games allow one to gain a look and feel of a position's orientation while facing the uncertainty one would face as if they played the game themselves.

About ReViewing Chess:
This series reverts back to a nineteenth century printing technique, cinéma des échecs, to reinvent the chess book as a training tool. Based on a method that not only understands the problems facing those whom attempt to study the game but addresses these problems head on by realizing a framework that eliminates the social obstacles preventing players from recognizing the joy and intellectual satisfaction the study of chess inspires.

About the Opening:
The Alekhine Defense is a chess opening named after Alexander Alekhine, who introduced it in the 1921 Budapest tournament in games against Endre Steiner and Fritz Sämisch. Four years later, the editors of the Fourth Edition of Modern Chess Openings (MCO-4) wrote, "Nothing is more indicative of the iconoclastic conceptions of the 'hypermodern school' than the bizarre defence introduced by Alekhine ... . Although opposing to all tenets of the classical school, Black allows his King's Knight to be driven about the board in the early stages of the game, in the expectation of provoking a weakness in White's centre pawns." White's imposing mass of pawns in the centre often includes pawns on c4, d4, e5, and f4. Grandmaster Nick de Firmian observes of Alekhine's in MCO-15 (2008), "The game immediately loses any sense of symmetry or balance, which makes the opening a good choice for aggressive fighting players." (From Wikipedia)

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